Art 4 and AP Studio Art
Art 4 and AP Studio Art Syllabus

Art 4/AP Syllabus

Mr. Arguelles

Deer Creek High School

narcisoarguelles@dcsok.org

http://www.deercreekhs.org/faculty/narciso_arguelles

Course Description: The goal of the Art 4/AP class is to provide a solid foundation in the creative, technical and historical aspects of studio art. The program encourages individual growth and development through a broad range of studio and academic experiences as we move forward to developing an AP portfolio.

Objectives:

  • Be able to create compositions through the elements of art and the principles of design.
  • To challenge subject, composition, and content in a work of art produced by the student.
  • To establish a bridge between the students visual perception, actual perception, and their ability to discern shape, form, and aesthetic content as a means to manipulation and control to the medium.
  • Awareness of the different mediums
  • Awareness of the different fields that an art career is possible.

Expectations:

  • All students are expected to be to class on time.
  • Students are expected to work every day.
  • Some supplies will need to be gathered outside of class, nothing to strenuous, and all materials should be readily available.
  • Have an open mind.
  • Respect for others and their property/artwork.

Although not a requirement, we suggest a $25 donation per semester or $50 for academic year to help fund consumable materials in the classroom (paint, paper, pencils, etc.) If you would rather your student have an itemized list for individual supplies, I would be more then happy to provide one, but the cost will be beyond the suggested donation price. 

All students must have a sketchbook as well. Quality sketchbooks may be purchased at Hobby Lobby or Porch School Supply.

Seniors will have the opportunity to participate in the following activities:

OCU Print and Draw Competition

Young Talent in Oklahoma

Scholastic Art and Writing

Senior Portfolio Day

State Superintendents Arts Awards

Grading:

Projects: 50%

Participation: 40%

Tests: 10%

ACADEMIC HONOR CODE

In order to sustain a community of trust in which students and teachers can work together to develop their educational potential and goals, ethical standards of honesty are expected so that all students may

compete fairly in the classroom to earn their academic standing through their own efforts. Violations of the honor code include lying, cheating, or stealing.

Acts of cheating are defined as follows:

1. Willfully copying or allowing class assignments to be copied.

2.     Falsely presenting other’s work as his/her own work.

3.              Using notes or any other prompts to assist in answering test questions, unless allowed by the teacher.

4.              Acquiring answers to test questions or homework by looking at any other students’ papers.

5.              Being informed, or informing verbally or otherwise, of test questions or answers either during or prior to the testing situation, as well as answers to homework assignments for which you are given.

6.              Plagiarizing someone else’s words or ideas.

7.              Use of on-line resources to assist with homework, class assignments, quizzes or tests is prohibited unless approved and allowed by the teacher.

A student who has been found to have violated the community of trust as expressed in the honor code will receive no credit (a zero) for the assignment on which the violation occurred, and his/her parent will be informed. Any student violating the academic honor code will lose semester test exemption status in all classes and recommendation for denial or dismissal from National Honor Society. Additional consequences may be added at the discretion of school personnel.

AP Studio Art: Drawing, 2D Design and 3-D Design Portfolio

 COURSE DESCRIPTION: 

All: Through studio practice, application of design concepts, and informed decision making, students will assemble a body of artwork that demonstrates a high level of quality and growth over time of content, technique, and process. Students will develop mastery in concept, composition and execution. Students will address three components in their portfolios: Quality, Concentration, and Breadth. Students will submit this body of work to the College Board for grading and possible college credit. 

This course has been developed to accommodate students who have expressed an interest in completing either the AP Studio Art: Drawing Portfolio Exam, the AP Studio Art: 2-D Design Portfolio Exam or the AP Studio Art: 3-D Design Portfolio Exam. Therefore, all content meets the requirements as stated in the student exam brochure. Through direct teacher instruction, emphasis will be placed on the production of a volume of quality pieces of artwork.                                                       

Students will be challenged to develop their own personal work. Students will develop and demonstrate mastery of concept, composition, and execution of their personal ideas and themes in Drawing, 2-D Design, or 3-D Design. Students will also understand that art making is an ongoing process that uses informed and critical decision making to determine outcomes to problems. Students will be expected to develop a comprehensive portfolio, and ongoing sketchbook, and they will also be expected to complete homework and all other images worked on outside of school that address each of these issues in a personal way. Formulaic solutions to problems are discouraged. Preliminary sketches, stories, thoughts, color schemes, and weekly observational assignments and ideas should be kept.

Artistic Integrity: Students are expected to use artistic integrity throughout the course. Work that is based on published photographs or the work of other artists must move beyond duplication to illustrate an original idea. 

Drawing Portfolio: Students will expand their drawing and two-dimensional design skills and advance their visual communication skills by exploring a variety of design processes and techniques, and compositional and aesthetic concepts. 

2-D Design Portfolio: Students will expand their two-dimensional design skills and advance their visual communication skills by exploring a variety of design processes and techniques, and compositional and aesthetic concepts. 

3-D Design Portfolio: Students will expand their three-dimensional design skills and advance their visual communication skills by exploring a variety of design processes and techniques, and compositional and aesthetic concepts. 

Prerequisites: 

All: Students should complete at least two of the following courses in order to be considered for the AP Drawing, 2D Design or 3-D Design course: Art 1-4, or by portfolio review. 

 Student Expectations:

All: This course is fast paced.  The process of developing a portfolio requires a great deal of time and effort. In order to achieve this objective, students must be dedicated to working both in class and outside of the classroom at home. I will expect a high level of commitment, engagement, energy, enthusiasm and self-sufficiency. Students are expected to attend class regularly, on-time and make full use of the allotted class time. Students are expected to complete projects on-time and by the stated due date. The open studio is designed to provide concentrated work time in the studio with a teacher present as a resource. Open studio is not required but is recommended for success. Days and times are TBD.

Homework—Students may receive specific assignments or just be asked to spend time working on a particular in-class assignment at home. They should be prepared to spend time outside of class on their work. 

Students will use a sketchbook as a visual journal to work through ideas, to practice drawing and design skills, and to record their journey through this year. Due to the amount of work students do outside of class, specific 

sketchbook assignments will not be made but it is expected that students will use their sketchbooks as tools for developing and recording their ideas. 

Critiques—the majority of class time is spent making artwork, though students are expected to participate in group and individual critiques throughout the semester. 

Drawing Portfolio:  

Students will produce a minimum of 24 works that satisfy the requirements of the Quality, Concentration, and Breadth sections of the AP Studio Art Drawing Portfolio. (see below)

2-D Design Portfolio:

Students will produce a minimum of 24 works that satisfy the requirements of the Quality, Concentration, and Breadth sections of the AP Studio Art 2D Design Portfolio. (see below)

3-D Design Portfolio:

Students will produce a minimum of 18 to 20 works that satisfy the requirements of the Quality, Concentration, and Breadth sections of the AP Studio Art 3-D Design Portfolio. (see below)

Open Studio Hours & Feedback

All:Open Studio hours will be accommodated as needed. One-on-one critiques are available at any time, and can be formally requested through email.  

Learning Objectives                          

All: The student will:                                                  

Choose which exam portfolio program is appropriate.

Show an understanding of the focus of the portfolio selected. 

Demonstrate a breadth of high-quality work: 12 pieces for Drawing and 2-D Design, or 8 pieces for 3-D Design.

Develop a personal concentration of 12 pieces.

Select the top-quality, excellent pieces for presentation.

Discuss and record the development of the concentration.

Explore postsecondary options.               

The Drawing portfoliois intended to address a wide range of approaches and media. Line quality, light and shade, rendering of form, composition, surface manipulation, the illusion of depth and mark-making are drawing issues that can be addressed through a variety of means, which could include painting, printmaking, mixed media, etc. Abstract, observational and inventive works may be submitted. The range of marks used to make drawings, the arrangement of the marks and the materials used to make are endless. Any work submitted in the Drawing portfolio that incorporates digital or photographic process must address drawing issues such as listed above, as well as mark-making. Students should demonstrate their understanding of design principles as they relate to Drawing medium or process. 

The 2-D Design portfoliois intended to address purposeful decision making about using the elements and principles of art in an integrated way. In the 2-D Design portfolio, the student should demonstrate their  understanding of design principles as applied to a two-dimensional surface, whether physical or virtual. The principles of design (unity/variety, balance, emphasis, contrast, rhythm, repetition, proportion/scale and figure/ground relationship) can be articulated through the visual elements (line, shape, color, value, texture, space). Any two-dimensional process or medium may be submitted, including, but not limited to, graphic design, digital imaging, photography, collage, fabric design, weaving, fashion design, illustration, painting, printmaking, etc. Video clips, DVD’s, CD’s and three-dimensional works may not be submitted. However, still images from videos or films are accepted. In the 2-D Design portfolio, students should demonstrate their understanding of design principles as they relate to 2-D medium or process. 

The 3-D Design Portfolio: This portfolio is intended to address engagement with space and materials. Design involves purposeful decision making about using the elements and principles of art in an integrative way. In the 3-D Design portfolio, the student should demonstrate their understanding of design principles as they relate to depth and space, whether physical or virtual. The principles of design (unity/variety, balance, emphasis, contrast, rhythm, repetition, proportion/scale, and occupied/unoccupied space) can be articulated through the visual elements (mas, volume, color/light, form, plane, line texture). These issues can be explored through additive, subtractive, and/or fabrication processes. Examples of approaches include, but are not limited to, figurative or nonfigurative sculpture, architectural models, metal work, ceramics, three-dimensional fiber arts/fashion, jewelry and body adornment, and time-based media. Any work submitted in the 3-D Design portfolio that incorporates digital processes must address 3-D Design issues such as those listed above, especially engagement with space, whether physical or virtual. 

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This course is designed to guide students in the creation of a portfolio that meets the criteria of the AP COLLEGE BOARD (above). The portfolio addresses three major concerns in the study of art that are broken down into 3 parts of the portfolio that must be submitted to the College Board for review and portfolio scoring.  

______________________________________________________________________SECTION I:

Quality- (Selected Works) – IMAGES OF FIVE WORKS THAT BEST DEMONSTRATE YOUR UNDERSTANDING OF AND ENGAGEMENT WITH …

… DRAWING– You are asked to demonstrate quality through five carefully selected examples of your work that show mastery, excellence, understanding of Drawing issues, design, concept and execution.

OR

… 2-D DESIGN – You are asked to demonstrate quality through five carefully selected examples of your work that show mastery, excellence, understanding of 2D design issues, concept and execution.

OR

… 3-D DESIGN– You are asked to demonstrate quality through fivecarefully selected examples of your work that show mastery, excellence, understanding of 3-D design issues, concept and execution. Carefully select 5 works that show in-depth understanding of and engagement with 3-D Design issues in their concept, composition, and execution. 

All:For your Quality section, choose the five works that you feel best represent your accomplishment. The five works may come from your Concentration and/or your Breadth section, but they don’t have to. They may be a group of related works, unrelated works or a combination of related and unrelated works.

SECTION II:

Concentration- (Sustained Investigation) – WORKS DESCRIBING AN IN-DEPTH EXPLORATION OF A PARTICULAR DRAWING, or 2D DESIGN, or 3-D DESIGN, CONCERN….12 IMAGES 

For your concentration, you are asked to make a commitment to thoughtful, sustained investigation of a specific visual idea. To document your process, you should present a number of conceptually relatedworks that show your growth and discovery. These works should use the principles of Drawing/2D Design/ or 3-D Design in an informed and /or experimental way. It is important to define your concentration early in the year so that the work you submit will have the focus and direction required for a sustained investigation.

A concentration is a body of related works that:

• GROW OUT OF A COHERENT PLAN OF ACTION OR INVESTIGATION

• ARE UNIFIED BY AN UNDERLYING IDEA THAT HAS VISUAL AND/OR CONCEPTUAL COHERENCE

• ARE BASED ON YOUR INDIVIDUAL INTEREST IN A PARTICULAR VISUAL IDEA

• ARE FOCUSED ON A PROCESS OF SUSTAINED INVESTIGATION, GROWTH AND DISCOVERY 

• SHOW THE DEVELOPMENT OF A VISUAL LANGUAGE APPROPRIATE FOR YOUR SUBJECT

A concentration is NOT:

• A VARIETY OF WORKS PRODUCED AS SOLUTIONS TO CLASS PROJECTS

• A COLLECTION OF WORKS WITH DIFFERING INTENTS

• A GROUP PROJECT OR COLLABORATION

• A COLLECTION OF WORKS DERIVED SOLELY FROM OTHER PEOPLE’S PUBLISHED    PHOTOGRAPHS

• A BODY OF WORK THAT SIMPLY INVESTIGATES A MEDIUM, WITHOUT A STRONG UNDERLYING VISUAL IDEA

• A PROJECT THAT MERELY TAKES A LONG TIME TO COMPLETE

EXAMPLES OF CONCENTRATION

The list of possible concentration topics is infinite. The examples of concentrations below are intended only to provide a sense of range and should NOTnecessarily be considered “better” ideas than your own. 

Drawing: 

• A series of expressive landscapes based on personal experience of a particular space

• A personal or family history communicated through the content and style of still-life images

• Abstractions from mechanical objects used to explore mark-making

• Interpretive self-portraits and figure studies that emphasize exaggeration and distortion

2-D Design:

• A series of works that begin with representational interpretations and evolves into abstraction

• An exploration of patterns and designs found in nature and/or culture

3-D Design:

• A series of three-dimensional representational works that begin with representational interpretations and evolves into abstraction

• A series of site-specific work that affect existing form or space

• Abstractions developed from natural or mechanical objects

• Wheel-thrown and hand-built clay objet s that allude to human or animal forms

• A series of sculptures that explore the relationship between interior and exterior space

Presenting Your Concentration

For this section, you must submit 12 images; some of them may be second views or details. You may have completed more than 12 works for your concentration. If this is the case, you should choose the 12 that best represent your process of sustained investigation. In most cases, this would be chronological.

You may NOTsubmit images of the same work that you are submitting for Breadth. Submitting images of the same work for your Concentration and Breadth sections may negatively affect your score. 

Commentary (Artist Statement)

A written commentary describing what your concentration is and how it evolved must accompany the work in this section. Responses should be concise. The commentary is not scored, but it does help in the evaluation process. The commentary consists of responses to the following:

1. Clearly and simply state the central idea of your concentration (500 character maximum).

2. Explain how the work in your concentration demonstrates your intent and the sustained investigation of your idea. You may refer to specific images as examples (1,350 character maximum)

Students will meet one on one with instructor to discuss Sustained Investigation. Student will present sketchbook with research and documentation of plan.            

SECTION III:

BREADTH (Range of Approaches) – A VARIETY OF WORKS DEMONSTRATING YOUR UNDERSTANDING OF…  

… Drawing ISSUES (12 images)

OR

… The principles of 2-D Design (12 images)

OR

… The principles of 3-D Design (16 images: 8 works, 2 views each, “works” can include fully resolved images and forms as well as sketches, models, plans, and diagrams)

Drawing:

In this section, the artworks the student submits should demonstrate their understanding of a range of drawing approaches. Include examples such as drawing from observation, work with invented or nonobjective forms, effective use of light and shade, line quality, surface manipulation, composition, various spatial systems and expressive mark-making. The student is asked to demonstrate that they are thoughtfully considering these concerns while making their art.

The best demonstrations of breadth clearly show a range of conceptual and/or technical approaches to Drawing for example, a single Breadth section might contain work that shows:

• the use of various spatial systems, such as linear perspective, the illusion of three-dimensional forms, aerial views and other ways of making and organizing space; and

• work that explores the transition from organic to mechanical form; and

• work that explores expressive marking with different tools and processes that represent form and space; and

• use of various subjects such as landscape, figure and still-lifes. 

If you choose a single medium – for example, if your portfolio consists entirely of charcoal drawings – the work must show a range of approaches, techniques, compositions and subjects. 

For this section, you must submit 12 images of 12 different works. 

2-D Design:

In this section, the artworks the student submit should demonstrate their understanding of the principles of 2-D Design.  Include examples of unity/variety, balance, emphasis, contrast, rhythm, repetition. Proportion/scale and figure/ground relationship in your Breadth section. The student is asked to demonstrate that they are thoughtfully applying these principles while making their art. 

The best demonstrations of Breadth clearly show a range of conceptual and/or technical approaches to 2-D Design. For example, a single Breadth section might contain:

• work that employs line, shape or color to create unity or variety in a composition; and

• work that demonstrates symmetry/asymmetry, balance or anomaly; and

• work that uses color relationships for emphasis or contrast in a composition.     

If you choose to use a single medium – for example, if your portfolio consists entirely of photography – the work must show a variety of approaches to the investigation of 2-D design principles.

For this section, you must submit 12 images of 12 different works. 

3-D Design:

In this section, the artworks the student submit should demonstrate their understanding of the principles of 3-D Design. Include examples of unity/variety, balance, emphasis, contrast, rhythm, repetition, proportion/scale and occupied/unoccupied space in their Breadth section. The student is asked to demonstrate that they are thoughtfully applying these principles while making their art. 

The best demonstration of Breadth clearly shows a range of conceptual and/or technical approaches to 3-D Design. For example, a single Breadth section might contain:

• work that employs line, plane, mass, volume or motion to activate form in space; and

• work that uses light or shadow to determine form, with particular attention to surface and interior space; and

• work that demonstrates an understanding of symmetry and asymmetry; and

• assemblage or constructed work that transforms materials or object identity through the manipulation of proportion/scale; and

• work in which the color and texture unify or balance the overall form of the piece; and

• work in which the color or texture is integral to the overall form of the piece; and

• work that explores the transition from organic to mechanical form.

If you choose to use a single medium – for example, if your portfolio consists entirely of ceramic pieces – the work must show a variety of approaches to the investigation of 3-D Design principles.

For this section, you must submit 16 images – 2 views of 8 works. The second view of each work should be taken from a different vantage point than the first view and could be a detail.

Assignments Examples (Drawing and 2-D Design):                     
1. Still-life of things that are important to you, under your bed, inside your closet; self-portraits, including your image reflected in a mirror, distorted in car keys, metal tree ornament, teapot, through a glass of water, and in a spoon. Reflective objects still-life with self-portrait component demonstrating strong range of abilities and variety in techniques and mediums, concepts, black-and-white mediums, color mediums, and a mixed variety. Focus on creating emphasis and contrast using directional lighting.

2. Portraits of classmates, a special friend, your favorite pet in its dwelling or bed; a bicycle still-life (charcoal studies — eight views and methods that demonstrate the student’s ability to think creatively, experiment with points of view and techniques, problem solve, and make critical decisions).

3. Figure drawing from a live model on white paper using charcoal. Focus on figure/ground relationships, proportion (sighting lines), positive/negative space. Begin with 30-second figure drawings and advance to several 20-minute poses fully rendered within a setting, on 20” x 24” white BFK drawing and/or printmaking paper. A third figure-drawing study in black-and-white media that distorts the figure in some way will be developed. Using directional lighting, develop hand and foot studies using ebony pencil and white chalk, hatching/ cross-hatching on gray paper. Focus on techniques, value, and contrast of value and visual texture for emphasis. As always, be sure to have a focal point for each composition that you develop.

4. Visit an antique store and buy an old typewriter, phone, lamp, saddle, worn boots, shoes and socks; use your favorite uniform (band, football, basketball, soccer, etc.); visit the science lab (bottles and experiments); observe figures dancing; draw figures in slow motion and stopped motion; use overlapping images, linear perspective; draw from the perspective of inside a transparent box, ant’s-eye view, bird’s-eye view, atop a ladder; draw images from your dreams and fantasies. Be innovative and experiment with a variety of singular media as well as mixed media and drawing, painting, and printmaking techniques. Mediums could include India ink, black marker pins on wet and dry paper, brushes, sticks, etc.                                                                                 

5. Transparent watercolors on dry and wet papers using a variety of brushes and wet into wet- and dry-brush techniques, opaque watercolors, oil paint, layering (using old-master techniques); use brushes and painting knives to build and model images and forms, acrylic paint, and gesso.                                        

6. Problem solve; take photographs of expressive compositions. Use color other than local color to render a finished product. Considerations include concept, technique, specific subject matter, medium, format, and size; piece should be no smaller than 8” x 8”. Focus on individual choice and application of color harmonies as well as unity and variety.                                                                                                   

7. Develop a landscape, interiors, exteriors, and/or cityscapes. Architectural perspective: take photographs of architectural structures in your town. These could be taken from the street side or the alley. Research, conceptualize, and compose a cropped architectural drawing based on your own photographs, using your choice of medium or mixed media. Format, size, and choice between color or black and white will reflect the student’s voice and ideation. Students are asked to experiment with techniques once a medium is chosen. Focus is on organizational skills, contrast, proportion, and scale. 

8. Demonstrate a possible theme, which you will make known through your use of color, line, space,  pattern/rhythm, and/or etch, that will demonstrate a high level of problem solving and critical-decision making. Use oil pastels and oil sticks, pastels on a variety of surfaces, charcoal, vine charcoal with eraser and charcoal pencil build up, white Conté crayon additions for contrast, powder graphite lift out and drawn back into with layering, and graphite pencils of varying weights and hardness as you shade and model forms so they are lifelike and appear three-dimensional. The elements of art and the principles of design should always be considered as you discern, think through, and create each of your works. We will review these as you work and plan your works.        

9. Portraits of classmates, a special friend, your favorite pet in its dwelling or bed; a bicycle still life

  • (charcoal studies — eight views and methods that demonstrate the student’s ability to think creatively,
  • experiment with points of view and techniques, problem solve, and make critical decisions)    

10-11. Create two unified landscapes through color, a principal of design or mark making. Find a landscape on your phone that you have taken. Use your images for reference or work from observation.

12. Create an exaggerated self portrait from observation. Focus on scale and proportion. Media is open.                                                                     

Artistic Responsibilities All:

Staying on task and devoting your utmost attention to your work is very important for success in this course. Searching for what arouses your curiosity. Make your work about the things that interest you and keep you up at night. Pursue your work with passion; do not settle for an unresolved problem. It is your responsibility to make your work personal and important to you. DEADLINES: Complete all assignments by designated deadlines. Participation in critiques. Only work that is finished will be critiqued and graded. An important part of the course in ongoing review, reflection (critique) of your own work and that of others. Submit a completed portfolio for submission, incomplete portfolios not will be submitted 

PLAGIARISM STATEMENT: All:

A particular kind of honor code violation occurs with plagiarism.  Plagiarism is defined as the use of another’s words, ideas, or artworkand the presentation of them as though they are entirely one’s own.  Acts of plagiarism include but are not limited to using words, artworkor ideas from a published source (including the Internet) without proper documentation; using the work/artworkof another student (e.g., copying another student’s artwork, homework, composition); using excessive editing suggestions of another student, teacher, parent, or paid editor.  Plagiarism on any project or paper will result in a zero for the assignment and an Honor Code Violation.  Unless directly stipulated by the teacher, collaboration on written work/artworkis not acceptable.  Students who willingly provide other students with access to their work are in violation of the school Honor Code.

Copyright Issues, Artistic Integrity, Ethics and Moving Beyond Duplication: All:

Students are discouraged from working from published or copyrighted photographs or images of any kind. Students are allowed to work from photographs they have taken themselves. If a student does work from a published or copyrighted image, the image must be significantly altered so that it does truly become his/her own, in the student’s own artistic voice, and in the student’s own personal style and expression. Mere duplication of another person’s image, even in a different medium is not allowed. Students are always encouraged to work directly from their own vision and unique personal imagery, whether it be direct observation, imagination, memory, with or without the aid of their own original photographs, or any combination of the above. A detailed discussion of plagiarism, fraud, and issues of artistic integrity will take place in class.  Ongoing 1 on 1 discussions as well as group discussions will take place throughout the course. All students submitted work must be original in nature. Work that is based on published photography or another artist’s work in not acceptable. The intent of Advanced Placement Studio Art is to develop a student’s personal voice and vision. Submitting work that is unoriginal would be contrary to that ideal. 

Classroom Safety PolicyAll:Students will receive instruction on safe practices, proper care of tools, equipment and supplies and will be expected to adhere to the safety guidelines. 

DAILY EXPECTATIONS: All:

  1. Be present-contribute to discussions, participate in course activities, use class time efficiently
  2. Be on-time, prepared, engage and persist in art experiences
  3. Complete all homework and class work with 100% effort and work on self-evaluation and improvement.
  4. Be responsible for tools, supplies, and studio work area
  5. Respect all people, materials, artwork in the art room
  6. Do your part to ensure the class runs smoothly-be careful not to distract other students
  7. Clean up after yourself, cheerfully, and without reminders

    DAILY REQUIREMENT: All: Bring your sketchbook, a writing instrument, student are  required to keep a visual sketchbook which should be brought to class and worked in during each class meeting. Students will record their research, documentation, experimentation and process in the sketchbook.

    TOOLS AND MATERIALS: All:  

    Some tools and materials will be checked out to you. You are responsible for their care. Lost or damaged tools must be paid for at the end of the semester.  

    EVALUATION/ASSESSMENT: All:1 Range           2 Range                       3 / 4 Range                  5 Range                                   ______________        ___________        ___________        _________________

  8. Totaled Percentage:           <59%    60%   65%    69%       70%    75%     79%         80%    85%     89%       90%    95%     100%

    Course Grade:                    F          D        D         D            C         C         C               B       B   B           A        A           A

     

    Course grade explanations

    We will follow the AP Scoring guidelines for grading

     

    Grade Distribution: All:

    Your grade will reflect the overall quality, thoroughness and dedication you have put forth in each part of the course listed below. Your grade will be determined as follows:

     

    (a) Art Experience Projects/Participation                                                                     50% of your final grade

    (b) Participation, Sketchbook process documentation, experimentation, research       40% of your final grade

    (c) Tests                                                                                                                      10% of your final grade

     

    *The course activities will be scored by content-specific rubrics that will be provided to the students in advance of the given assignments.

                 

    Portfolio reviews will occur near the end of 7, 15, and 20 weeks.  

    Parents may request a meeting with the teacher throughout the school year.

     

    ABSENCES AND MAKE-UP WORK: All:

    Students are responsible for ALL information covered in class. If absent, the student should:

  9. Check The Class Website and The class Google Classroom, email me if you know you will be out.
  10. Handouts/Notes Outlines/PPTs can be found on class Website and Google Classroom
  11. Talk with the instructor, before school starts, after class or during your lunch break about making up work  

Recommended Reading: When Applicable:                                                                                                          

Kaupelis, Robert. Experimental Drawing. 30th Anniversary Edition. New York: Watson- Guptill Publications, 1992.                                                                                   

Lauer, David. Design Basics. Ninth Edition. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing, 2015. Maslan, Mick and Southern, Jack. Drawing Projects: An Exploration of the Language of                                                                          

Drawing Projects. London: Black Dog Publishing, 2011.                                                                                                                                                         

Stewart, Mary. Launching the Imagination: A Comprehensive Guide to Basic Design, Fifth Edition. New York: McGraw-Hill Higher Education, 2014.                                                                

YouTube Channel. “The Art Assignment.” Accessed February 1, 2017. https://www. youtube.com/user/theartassignment.